Back to Home Page
Afghanistan
Albania
Algeria
American Samoa
Andorra
Angola
Anguilla
Antigua and Barbuda
Argentina
Armenia
Aruba
Australia
Austria
Azerbaijan
Bahamas
Bahrain
Bangladesh
Barbados
Belarus
Belgium
Belize
Benin
Bermuda
Bhutan
Bolivia
Bosnia Herzegovina
Botswana
Brazil
Brunei Darussalam
Bulgaria
Burkina Faso
Burundi
Cabo Verde
Cambodia
Cameroon
Canada
Cayman Islands
Central African Republic
Chad
Chile
China
China, Macao SAR
Colombia
Comoros
Costa Rica
Côte d'Ivoire
Croatia
Cuba
Cyprus
Czechia
Democratic People's Republic of Korea
Democratic Republic of the Congo
Denmark
Djibouti
Dominica
Dominican Republic
Ecuador
Egypt
El Salvador
Equatorial Guinea
Eritrea
Estonia
Ethiopia
Fiji
Finland
France
French Guiana
Gabon
Gambia
Georgia
Germany
Ghana
Greece
Greenland
Grenada
Guam
Guatemala
Guinea
Guinea-Bissau
Guyana
Haiti
Honduras
Hong Kong
Hungary
Iceland
India
Indonesia
Iran
Iraq
Ireland
Israel
Italy
Jamaica
Japan
Jersey, Channel Islands
Jordan
Kazakhstan
Kenya
Kiribati
Kosovo
Kuwait
Kyrgyzstan
Lao People's Democratic Republic
Latvia
Lebanon
Lesotho
Liberia
Libya
Liechtenstein
Lithuania
Luxembourg
Madagascar
Malawi
Malaysia
Maldives
Mali
Malta
Marshall Islands
Martinique
Mauritania
Mauritius
Mexico
Micronesia, Fed. Sts.
Monaco
Mongolia
Montenegro
Morocco
Mozambique
Myanmar
Namibia
Nauru
Nepal
Netherlands
New Zealand
Nicaragua
Niger
Nigeria
North Macedonia
Norway
Oman
Pakistan
Palau
Panama
Papua New Guinea
Paraguay
Peru
Philippines
Poland
Portugal
Puerto Rico
Qatar
Rep. of Korea
Republic of Moldova
Republic of the Congo
Réunion
Romania
Russian Federation
Rwanda
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines
Samoa
San Marino
Sao Tome and Principe
Saudi Arabia
Senegal
Serbia
Seychelles
Sierra Leone
Singapore
Slovakia
Slovenia
Solomon Islands
Somalia
South Africa
South Sudan
Spain
Sri Lanka
Sudan
Suriname
Swaziland
Sweden
Switzerland
Syria
Taiwan, China
Tajikistan
Thailand
Timor-Leste
Togo
Tonga
Trinidad and Tobago
Tunisia
Turkey
Turkmenistan
Tuvalu
Uganda
Ukraine
United Arab Emirates
United Kingdom
United Republic of Tanzania
Uruguay
USA
Uzbekistan
Vanuatu
Venezuela
Vietnam
Virgin Islands (U.S.)
West Bank and Gaza
Yemen
Zambia
Zimbabwe
Papua New Guinea
Risk Score
83.4
Risk Profile
Higher Risk
Conflict State
Yes
Log Export Restriction
Yes
Other Timber Export Restrictions
Yes
Import Regulation
No
Legality Risks Click for details on legality risks
  • Papua New Guinea’s (PNG) logging and land clearance for agricultural projects occur predominantly in natural forest areas.
    The majority of exports are roundlogs. There is little plantation production and only a limited number of processing facilities.
  • There are reportedly serious governance and corruption challenges highly relevant to the forestry sector. Multiple official inquiries and independent studies have documented widespread corruption and failure to enforce laws.
  • NGOs continue to document sector-wide illegalities.
  • Forest clearance permits intended for agricultural development, often used as a pretext for gaining access to timber, have become a major source of logs exported from PNG over the last decade. These permits are frequently issued illegally and without transparency or due process, in particular violating laws around customary land rights.
  • The vast majority of logs are destined for China where they account for approximately one-third of the annual import of tropical logs. The EU and U.S. do not import wood products directly from PNG, but import a number of wood products manufactured in China that potentially contain wood from PNG. 
  • The log export monitoring system developed by the SGS Group (SGS), which covers taxes paid, species and volumes, is not designed to verify timber legality. A national Timber Legality Standard, under development since 2010, has not been finalized and continues to  contain significant gaps in coverage according to civil society experts.

Read more by downloading Papua New Guinea’s Timber Legality Risk Dashboard here.

Latest Updates Click for latest news from Papua New Guinea
April 10, 2024
Ghost roads and the destruction of Asia-Pacific tropical forests

All nations have some unmapped or unofficial roads, but the situation is especially bad in biodiversity-rich developing nations, where roads are proliferating at the fastest pace in human history.

 

When ghost roads appear, local deforestation soars—usually immediately after the roads are built. We found the density of roads was by far the most important predictor of forest loss, outstripping 38 other variables.

Also reported here: Scientists find vast numbers of illegal ‘ghost roads’ used to crack open pristine rainforest (phys.org)

More...
December 27, 2023
https://news.mongabay.com/2023/12/a-decade-of-stopping-deforestation-how-the-palm-oil-industry-did-the-seemingly-impossible-commentary/

Wilmar International’s No Deforestation, No Peat, No Exploitation policy, announced ten years ago, marked a significant milestone in environmental conservation by prohibiting deforestation, peatland destruction, land-grabbing, and labor abuses in their global supply chain, impacting thousands of palm oil companies.

The policy, a result of global campaigning and intense negotiations, contributed to a dramatic reduction in deforestation for palm oil by over 90%, influencing other industries and contributing to the lowest deforestation levels in Indonesia, as well as progress in Malaysia, Papua New Guinea, and tropical Africa, argues Glenn Hurowitz, the Founder and CEO of Mighty Earth, who led the negotiation with Wilmar.

Hurowitz says this “success story” highlights the importance of private sector involvement, effective campaigning, diligent implementation, the necessity of continuous effort, and the insufficiency of data alone in driving change.

More...
July 26, 2023
In a historic win, Papua New Guinea acts against logging tax cheats. What happens next?

PNG’s  tax authority has imposed a historic £31 million assessment against a logging operator for tax evasion.

Internal Revenue Commissioner (IRC) General Sam Koim, who announced the audit findings on June 26, said: “The logging sector in PNG has long been suspected of involvement in tax evasion. Instead of turning a blind [eye], we have initiated over twenty audits since I took office… I am pleased to report that this is the first outcome of those audits.”

 

More...
June 15, 2023
The Pacific Is Becoming a Testing Ground for Green Geopolitics

The recent security agreements between Papua New Guinea and the United States are a good deal for the planet—but a tough pill for Beijing to swallow, and one that might come with potential blowback.

 

The new agreements accelerate coastal security strategies that also help with climate change adaptation by protecting vulnerable fisheries. These new moves point toward greater opportunities for further climate mitigation and resilience, using existing climate programs in Papua New Guinea and international climate financing. Papuan Prime Minister James Marape has often spoken of his enthusiasm for climate financing, which is also a high priority for the whole of the Blue Pacific Continent 2050 strategy that was endorsed and launched last July 2022 by a coalition of island nations. With the Biden administration set to host a major U.S.-Pacific island summit this fall, American interest in Pacific climate adaptation is growing.

 

But one aspect of these programs that American officials discuss only behind closed doors is their role in countering Chinese influence in the Pacific. Some of the programs are aimed at curbing environmental damage committed largely by Chinese companies through questionable fishing practices and widespread logging and mining. Pushing Chinese firms with dubious environmental practices out of Papua New Guinea and elsewhere also helps reduce the role of Chinese money, and influence, in Pacific politics—a double win for the United States.

More...
June 2, 2023
US-PNG defence cooperation to address illegal logging

The United States and Papua New Guinea have signed a new defence and maritime cooperation agreement to combat illegal fishing, illegal logging and drug smuggling in PNG waters. The two countries also agreed to further climate-change cooperation when regional leaders met in Port Moresby for the US–Pacific Islands Forum Leaders’ Dialogue.

More...
View More Articles
April 6, 2023
PNG: Cracking down on illegal logging activities

Chairman for Law and Order, Edwin Maigen, called for the investigation, charging and harsh punishment of three Malaysians, whom he alleges are connected to logging companies operating in New Ireland. He accused Malaysian companies of monopolizingi the logging industry in PNG and harming the country’s people and infrastructure.

Acting Provincial Administrator and Forestry Enforcement Crime Unit Chairman Moses Taram expressed his concern about the incident and announced a crackdown on illegal activities at logging camps.

A task force comprising customs, immigration, police and labor will investigate logging camps to ensure that these companies operate within the legal limits.

More...
April 11, 2022
Illegal Loggers Detained

The immigration and Citizenship Authority Special Operations team has repatriated 22 men into Port Moresby from Wewak, East Septik Province over alleged involvement in illegal logging in Hawain.

More...
March 24, 2022
Duplicate Land Titles An Issue: Rosso

The duplication of land titles has become an issue and the Minister for Lands, John Rosso is determined to correct a lot of those illegal deals and have the land transferred back to the original title holders.

More...
February 14, 2022
PNG group wants re-think on forest law and management

Papua New Guinea’s Centre for Environment Law and Community Rights, or CELCOR, wants police working for logging companies to be sacked from the force. This follows the killing of two landowners and a policeman at a forestry site in East Sepik last month. Those deaths have sparked a parliamentary call for an inquiry into police staff working for logging companies as security.

More...
September 30, 2017
Bank of PNG National Assessment RIsk includes illegal logging and links to money laundering

The 2017 National Assessment of Risk by the Bank of PNG states that ” The threats and vulnerabilities most likely to have severe domestic ML consequences for PNG are tax evasion (including GST fraud), illicit drug related activities and the movement of funds obtained from bribery and corruption. The laundering of funds derived from illegal logging and fishing are more likely to accrue offshore, although some of this will find its way back to PNG to support continuation of these activities. This has international implications for PNG because those countries face a domestic ML problem created by criminal offences within PNG and this requires cooperation between PNG authorities and those in neighbouring jurisdictions.

 

The highest priority for the offshore ML of funds generated within PNG is to address the cause: corruption and the ongoing illegal logging and fishing. PNG can and should work with other jurisdictions to trace, locate, freeze and recover these criminal proceeds but addressing the problem at its source is critical.”

More...
Publications Click for publications related to Papua New Guinea
Papua New Guinea’s (PNG) logging and land clearance for agricultural projects occur predominantly in natural forest areas. The majority of exports are roundlogs. There is little plantation production and only a limited number of processing facilities. There are reportedly serious governance and corruption challenges highly relevant to the forestry sector. Multiple official inquiries and independent […]
While subsistence agriculture and logging still contribute to deforestation, commercial-scale agricultural expansion is now recognized as by far the single largest driver of deforestation worldwide and thus also of greenhouse gas emissions from land-use change. Several initiatives have quantified how much and where deforestation is driven by commercial agriculture, and even how much of this […]
Key Resources
Click here for a collection of Forest Trends publications related to IDAT Risk, including the full set of Timber Legality Risk Country Dashboards.
Methodology
Click here to download the Methodology which includes information on data sources, the methodology used to create risk indicators, and a glossary of key terms.
Data Tools

Click here to access the Global Illegal Logging and Associated Trade (ILAT) Risk assessment tool and to download the Forest Trends User Guide describing the functionality of the ILAT Risk Data Tool.

Click here to access the Cattle Data Tool.

Export Restrictions
Click here to download a database of forest policy export restrictions.