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Democratic Republic of the Congo
Risk Score
97.7
Risk Profile
Higher Risk
Conflict State
Yes
Log Export Restriction
Yes
Other Timber Export Restrictions
No
Import Regulation
No
Legality Risks Click for details on legality risks

Deforestation rates have almost doubled in the last decade (2010-2020) compared with 2000-2010. The DRC reported a loss of over one million hectares annually between 2010 and 2020, the third highest in the world behind China and Brazil. Much of this recorded loss has taken place in the last few years, with the University of Maryland reporting that 2017 was a record year for tree cover loss in the DRC. Deforestation is reportedly driven by a range of factors, with studies pointing to slash-and-burn agriculture and, increasingly, artisanal logging which is often illegal, as well as charcoal production. Industrial forest concessions only cover roughly 7 percent of the DRC’s forests with the World Resources Institute suggesting that just 10 percent of the 2017 forest loss occurred inside logging concessions.

  • Illegal logging is increasing and driving deforestation in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC).
  • There are well-publicized governance challenges, subnational conflict, and reports of corruption in the DRC’s timber sector.
  • There is a high risk that timber has been logged without the proper permits or that the permits were corruptly obtained.  
  • There remains a risk of unsustainable and illegal trade in Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) listed species. 
  • Forest laws are not well-enforced.
  • Non-mandated independent monitoring and watchdog groups are facing intimidation.
  • Tax evasion is widespread.
  • Direct exports to U.S. and European Union (EU) markets have fallen significantly, while exports to Vietnam and India have rapidly risen.

Read more by downloading the DRC Timber Legality Risk Dashboard here.

 

Latest Updates Click for latest news from Democratic Republic of the Congo
August 1, 2022

The Democratic Republic of the Congo is impoverished: 73% of its nearly 100 million people live on less than $2 a day. But it has one asset that the Global North truly values — its rainforests, which absorb 4% of the world’s annual CO2 emissions and thus delay or prevent a climate breakdown.

The Congo wants to increase its oil development from 25,000 barrels a day to 1 million barrels — something that would improve the lives of its people and perhaps replace some Russian oil. But western nations and environmentalists are shocked at the idea, thinking it would destroy the country’s rainforests. But most such areas are theoretically protected by national law. The Congo is not just an emerging nation. It’s a sovereign nation that says selling oil would allow it to advance economically and socially.

The irony is that the more affluent countries talk out of both sides of their mouth. On the one hand, they promised $1.5 billion in 2021 to protect those rainforests. On the other, the United States, the European Union, and China are buying cheap timber from the Congo — and sometimes illegally.

More...
May 31, 2022

An investigation by EL PAÍS/Planeta Futuro finds evidence of illegal extraction of endangered tree species, precious minerals and strategic metals headed for global markets.

The investigation reveals that Chinese-owned companies use ‘complaisance’ permits to log and export CITES II-listed Afrormosia, which international demand pushed to extinction in other African countries, and flags irregularities in the latest export quota. European countries will consider stricter measures on imports from the DRC.

Military-protected concessionaires have been illegally mining gold, diamonds and rare metals with prospecting licenses for more than a year. They use mercury, a neurotoxic pollutant, in waters communities use to fish, bathe and drink.

Mongabay has partnered with EL PAÍS/Planeta Futuro to publish this investigation in English. This story was produced with the support of the Rainforest Journalism Investigations Network (RIN) of the Pulitzer Center.

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May 6, 2022

The publication of an audit of forestry contracts in the Democratic Republic of Congo has exposed serious management failures. The audit cites serial breaches of the country’s forest code and more than a dozen violations of a 2002 moratorium on new concession.

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April 26, 2022

The Democratic Republic of Congo’s government has suspended 12 forestry  contracts for violating a moratorium on new logging concessions in place since 2002, officials said Tuesday. President Felix Tshisekedi announced last October that complaints had been made about irregularities over the granting of forestry concessions and that he had ordered the suspension of all “doubtful” contracts.

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April 7, 2022

Six successive ministers in the Democratic Republic of Congo illegally allocated at least 18 logging concessions between them and repeatedly violated forest laws, a national audit has found. The report by the General Inspectorate of Finance (IGF), finalised in May 2021 but not published until last Friday, paints a scathing picture of failed forest governance from the top of the ministry down through the administration’s ranks. It describes “a situation of chaos” which benefits those involved in the sector and slams the “culpable laxity” of the environment ministry.

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April 6, 2022

The Democratic Republic of Congo, home to the bulk of the world’s second-biggest rain forest, said it will review all forestry contracts days after a scathing government audit showed widespread tax avoidance and the illegal issue of logging permits.

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April 1, 2022

The Democratic Republic of Congo published a scathing government audit report on the state of its forest and logging concessions, a first step in unlocking as much as $500 million in funding to support its climate-change commitments under the Central African Forest Initiative. The Inspector General report, which is dated May 2021, alleges that between 2014 and 2020 Congo’s environmental ministry illegally allocated logging permits and defied a moratorium on new concessions in place since 2002. Millions of dollars in fees, taxes, and royalties related to the permits have either not been paid or not made it to the public treasury, the report says.

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March 3, 2022

A large European logging group has irregularly converted more than a dozen of its logging permits in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) into so-called conservation concessions. After extracting the most valuable tropical timber from 15 of them — covering an area the size of Belgium — the Portuguese-owned Norsudtimber group now plans to invest in projects to sell carbon credits in the former logging areas.

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February 2, 2022

A major deal to help end deforestation has missed its first deadline just months after it was signed at COP26, Sky News can reveal. At the Glasgow climate summit, a group of donor countries promised $500m (£370m) to the DRC to protect the Congo Basin – which absorbs 4% of the world’s carbon dioxide but is suffering widespread forest loss – in a pact signed by Prime Minister Boris Johnson.

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December 9, 2021

The peatlands of the Congo Basin are perhaps the most intact in the tropics, but threats from logging, agriculture and extractive industries could cause their rapid degradation, scientists say. In 2021, the government of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) announced that it was planning to end a moratorium on the issuance of logging concessions that had been in place for nearly two decades.

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November 2, 2021

The Democratic Republic of Congo’s environment minister said on Thursday the country plans to ban all log exports. The country also plans to take measures to lessen threats to its tropical rainforest. The forest takes in carbon dioxide and produces oxygen. It is a major move to fight climate change. Congo is home to the majority of the world’s second-largest rainforest. The country is under pressure to improve how it administers the forest.

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October 24, 2021

The government is keen to emphasise its environmental credentials and fears illegal contracts have put US$1 billion international conservation funding at risk Chinese firms are not directly targeted, but the country is the biggest export market for rosewood – a resource targeted by illegal logging operations

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Key Resources
Click here for a collection of Forest Trends publications related to IDAT Risk, including the full set of Timber Legality Risk Country Dashboards.
Methodology
Click here to download the Methodology which includes information on data sources, the methodology used to create risk indicators, and a glossary of key terms.
Timber Data Tool
Click here to access the Global Illegal Logging and Associated Trade (ILAT) Risk assessment tool and to download the Forest Trends User Guide describing the functionality of the ILAT Risk Data Tool.
Export Restrictions
Click here to download a database of forest policy export restrictions.