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Improving Production and Livelihoods in China through Tenure and Regulatory Reform

Event Overview

Improving Production and Livelihoods in China through Tenure and Regulatory Reform

September 21, 2006

Beijing, China

Second in a series of two workshops to present and discuss issues related to a sustainable forest and related industries' sector, which will cover aspects from strengthening domestic production and rural livelihoods through collective tenure reform to sustainable international trade. This workshop focuses specifically on improving production and livelihoods through tenure and regulatory reform in China. It presents results of new research from China and evidence from other major forestry countries.











    For more information, contact Jordan Sauer at jsauer@forest-trends.org

    Resources


    Plans, Progress and Challenges in China's Collective Tenure and Policy Reform (Chinese)
    by Jiang Jisheng, State Forestry Administration

     

    Global Overview of Trends in Tenure and Regulatory Reform
    by Andy White, RRI

     

    Local Experience in Tenure Reform
    by Chai Xitang, Fujian Department of Forestry

     

    Community Forestry in India: Evaluating the roles of state and community in natural resource management
    by Ashwini Chhatre, Harvard University

     

    Testing the Community Forestry Hypothesis in Mexico : Poverty Alleviation and Forest Protection
    by David Bray, Florida International University

     

    Analysis of Laws that Affect Collective Forest Owners and their Interactions with Government and Industry
    by Li Ping, Rural Development Institute

     

    Impacts of Forest Tenure Reform on Farmer Forest Management in Fujian
    by Kong Xiangzhi, People's University of China

     

    Economic Analysis of Collective Forest Tenure Formation
    by Xu Jintao, Peking University

     

    Collective Forest Reform: Case Study Analysis
    by Hou Meng, Peking University


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