East and Southern Africa Katoomba Group
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November 10, 2008

FROM THE EDITOR

Dear Katoomba Members,

Welcome to the November 2008 edition of the East and Southern Africa Katoomba Group e-newsletter. 

Our newsletter aims to keep our readers aware of the latest news and events relating to markets and payments for ecosystem services (PES) in the East and Southern Africa region and around the world.

We welcome your feedback, comments and suggestions, including any articles that you may wish to share with our readers. Please send them by e-mail to aruhweza@forest-trends.org

Yours sincerely

Alice Ruhweza
Coordinator, East and Southern Africa Katoomba Group

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

1. ESA Katoomba News

2. New PES Related News from the Region

3. News from Across the Ocean

4. Other Related News

5. Upcoming Events

6. Resources & Tools

7. New Publications

ESA Katoomba News

EAST AND SOUTHERN AFRICA KATOOMBA GROUP ONLINE DISCUSSION FORUM

The East and Southern Africa Katoomba Group has launched an online discussion forum. The forum is a response to a request by members during the recent regional Katoomba meeting in Tanzania in September. Members said they wanted a forum where they could discuss and share experiences on various topics particularly challenges related to PES. We have created this space to give members an opportunity to do exactly that. 

Members interested in having a hosted discussion on a specific topic for a certain amount of time with colleagues and partners in the Katoomba Group within East and Southern Africa or globally should contact us at aruhweza@forest-trends.org . Please provide us with a brief description of the idea and the specific outputs you seek. We will organize the discussion and get in touch with you and all members about the timing and moderation of this discussion forum.  The member requesting the forum will also be asked to prepare an introductory document that can be sent to the Katoomba listserves in Africa and globally (as appropriate) to start the discussion group.

  – For more information please visit

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THE KATOOMBA GROUP INCUBATOR FOR EAST AND SOUTHERN AFRICA

The  East and Southern Africa Katoomba Group has launched an ‘Incubator’ that will provide assistance to small scale and community projects that have had difficulty accessing markets for ecosystem services.  Small-scale producers are often in remote locations with no access to information about environmental markets and no support from local institutions.  Tenure and user rights are either non-existent or fuzzy.  Yet these rural producers of ecosystem services should be the beneficiaries of these emerging payments. The Katoomba Incubator will, therefore, facilitate technical, financial and market assistance for these projects in East and Southern Africa.

A similar Incubator has been active in Latin America for almost two years.  The expansion of the Incubator model to the African region begins with an identification of carbon projects in Uganda and Tanzania, facilitating the local projects’ entry to a global market and serving as a prototype for similar projects across Africa.  The Incubator has already seen a positive response in Africa: when introduced at the recent regional Katoomba meeting in Tanzania, the Incubator drew inquiries and requests for expansion from Ghana, Madagascar, Malawi, and Ethiopia.  For more information, contact Sara Namirembe (snamirembe at forest-trends.org).

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STATE AND PRACTICE OF THE FOREST CARBON MARKETS A KATOOMBA GROUP SIDE EVENT AT THE UN CONFERENCE OF PARTIES POZNAŃ, POLAND

The Ecosystem Marketplace and the Katoomba Group will host a side panel on Forest Day at the world’s premier gathering of experts and decision-makers in the climate change field – the UN Conference of Parties, December 6th, 2008.  We will present trends in the forest carbon markets and the preliminary structure of the online Forest Carbon Portal.  We will also present findings from our first annual State of the Forest Carbon Markets report, including quantitative data and qualitative analysis of the regulated and voluntary markets for forest carbon around the world.  After preliminary findings are presented, a panel of experts, including project developers, standards organizations, and buyers will share their own insights into the current state of the market for forest-based offsets. Experiences and key lessons will be showcased from the Katoomba Ecosystem Services Incubator’s forest carbon projects in Latin America and Africa.  For more information, contact Kate Hamilton (khamilton @forest-trends.org).

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New PES Related News from the Region

WILDLIFE CONSERVATION SOCIETY AND GOVERNMENT OF MADAGASCAR AGREE TO SAVE PRISTINE FOREST THROUGH SALE OF 9 MILLION TONNES FOF CARBON OFFSETS

The Wildlife Conservation Society and the Government of Madagascar announced a landmark agreement, where the government will offer for sale more than nine million tons of carbon offsets to help safeguard this African nation’s most pristine forest. Proceeds from sales will protect the wildlife-rich Makira Forest, contribute to the economic well-being of people living around the forest, and help fight global climate change.  The carbon offsets will be marketed and sold by the government in private transactions with the aid of MCC. MCC will work in collaboration with the Ministry of Environment, Water, Forests, and Tourism of Madagascar. The Madagascar government, with MCC as its agent, will seek carbon offset transactions with principals, brokers, dealers, and other intermediaries in the United States and abroad who wish to purchase high quality emissions reductions delivering multiple benefits – climate change mitigation, biodiversity conservation, and sustainable economic development.

The Makira Forest spans 400,000 hectares (more than 1,500 square miles), making it one of the largest remaining intact blocks of rainforest in Madagascar. It contains 22 species of lemurs, hundreds of bird species, and thousands of plant varieties, many of which are found nowhere else on earth. About 50 percent of Madagascar’s unique biodiversity, and one percent of the world’s biodiversity, exists within the greater Makira landscape. The landscape provides a critical forest corridor, which allows wildlife to travel between adjoining protected areas and outlying blocks of forest. The Makira Forest provides vital ecosystem services, such as clean water to the approximately 300,000 people who live around it.

In Madagascar, 100,000 hectares (386 square miles) of forest are lost each year due to burning for agricultural land

  – For more details on this story visit

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UGANDA POISIED TO BENEFIT FROM FOREST CARBON PARTNERSHIP FACILITY

On October 24, 2008, Uganda became the latest African country to become part of the Forest Carbon Partnership Facility (FCPF). – Fourteen forested countries had been identified as participants in July; the others including Uganda were added recently.  With more than 40 developing countries asking to become part of the Forest Carbon Partnership Facility, the FCPF is looking to expand its expected number of developing country participants from 20 countries to 30.
 
The developing countries accepted into the Facility include 10 in Africa (Cameroon, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Ethiopia, Gabon, Ghana, Kenya, Liberia, Madagascar, Republic of Congo and Uganda); 10 in Latin America (Argentina, Bolivia, Colombia, Costa Rica, Guyana, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay and Peru); and five in Asia and the South Pacific (Lao PDR, Nepal, Papua New Guinea, Vanuatu and Vietnam).

The FCPF aims to reduce deforestation and forest degradation by compensating developing countries for greenhouse gas emission reductions.  The partnership became functionally operational on June 25, 2008.  Tropical and sub-tropical countries will receive grant support as they build their capacity to tap into future systems of positive incentives for REDD, in particular by establishing emissions reference levels, adopting REDD strategies, and designing monitoring systems.

Tropical forested countries are seeking to build capacity to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by reducing deforestation and forest degradation (REDD). Countries are investing considerable time and resources to prepare themselves for REDD

  – For more on this story visit

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AFRICAN COUNTRIES PLEDGE US$ 20 MILLION TOWARDS ASSESSMENT OF CARBON PROJECTS

At the recent United Nations-backed Africa Carbon Forum in Senegal, several African countries pledged $20 million to go towards the Africa Bio-fuels and Renewable Energy Fund, a public/private sector partnership tasked with assessing carbon offset projects.

 “Much remains to be done in the form of awareness-raising and capacity-building before African countries can take full advantage of the CDM, but progress is being made, and we saw it here,” said Daniele Violetti of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC).
Africa still accounts for only 27 of the more than 1,150 CDM projects currently registered in nearly 50 developing nations, but that number is expected to grow.

The main objective of the forum was to improve the continent’s standing in the global carbon marketplace. Some 600 participants from 60 countries attended the Carbon Forum in the Senegalese capital, Dakar, including 36 government representatives responsible for initial approval of emissions offset projects.

  – For more details on this story visit

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News from Across the Ocean

BRAZIL'S ECOSYSTEM PAYMENTS SYSTEM OFFERS CLUES FOR REDD IMPLEMENTATION SAYS NEW REPORT

Brazil's existing system for environmental services payments could offer insight for implementing carbon-credits-for-forest-conservation (REDD) initiatives in the Amazon rainforest, argues a London School of Economics researcher in a new paper published in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society. Reviewing the performance of Brazil's Programme for the Socio-Environmental Development of Rural Family Production (Proambiente), Anthony Hall writes, "Despite being fraught with problems, Proambiente is one tool among many which could reward small producers for enhancing carbon sequestration and biodiversity conservation."

Proambiente was launched four years ago as a way to compensate rural Brazilians for environmental services afforded by forests, including: "reduction or avoidance of deforestation; carbon sequestration; recuperation of ecosystem hydrological functions; soil conservation; preservation of biodiversity; and reduction of forest fire risks." Hall reports that of 4200 participating families, 1768 have received total payments averaging $325 per household to date — well below what had been promised to Proambiente participants. Hall said the program suffered from "the lack of a national legal framework, limited funding, reduced implementation capacity, poor cross sector collaboration and incompatibility with existing regional development policies."

Still, says Hall, by offering farmers incentives that promote conservation rather than deforestation, Proambiente is an important departure from pervious government policies in the Amazon.

"Official subsidies for Amazon settlement have historically encouraged deforestation rather than conservation. Yet [payments for environmental services - (PES)] could help alter this perverse pattern," he writes. "One such set of policies involves providing financial rewards to rural landowners and resource users who adopt environmentally friendly practices, ranging from outright conservation to sustainable development techniques. Financial compensation in the form of PES rendered would reward resource-users for their efforts to either preserve forests and other natural resources intact, and/or introduce production systems that generate economic surplus and sustain local populations without destroying the resource base upon which people's livelihoods depend."

Hall says that increased funding from REDD schemes could bolster and expand programs like Proambiente, while offering lessons for implementation.

"On balance, however, using PES to promote reduced emissions from deforestation could help avert the potentially fatal consequences of current development patterns in Amazonia upon both the environment and on people's livelihoods. In spite of the many challenges which must be faced, therefore, it is far better to be RED than dead," he concludes.

Carbon offsets versus other types of land use in the Amazon rain forest. Environmentalists and conservation scientists say REDD — a carbon offset mechanism approved during December climate talks in Bali — holds great promise for funding rainforest compensation while at the same time improving rural incomes and fighting climate change.

  – For more information see

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Other Related News

AGRICULTURE SECTOR SEEKS OPPORTUNITIES TO TAP INTO THE CARBON MARKET

On 28 October 2008, Agricultural experts met to discuss how the sector can tap into the billions of dollars available every year under the United Nations-sponsored Kyoto Protocol – aimed at reducing global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions – to improve the lives of poor farmers from around the world. Every year an estimated $15 billion is on hand under the Kyoto Protocol’s Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) to finance initiatives that help reduce GHG emissions into the atmosphere.

Although agriculture is a leading source of GHG emissions, accounting for roughly 30 per cent of global production, the sector sees little of the money, according to a press release issued by the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO).

 “This is a win-win-win opportunity,” FAO Senior Officer Theodor Friedrich told the some 100 experts attending the three-day meeting held in West Lafayette, a town in Indiana, United States.

“We have a chance to slow climate change, help poor farmers make a better living and improve soil health and productivity all at the same time,” he added.

Traditional tilling and ploughing releases carbon dioxide stored in the land contributing to GHG build-up and climate change, but new systems, such as no-till Conservation Agriculture – drilling seeds directly into the soil – are much more climate friendly and can remove significant quantities of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and store it in the soil.

“[The] application of no-tillage farming methods to all of the world’s 5 billion hectares of agricultural land could allow up to 3 billion tons of atmospheric carbon to be sequestered every year for 30 years,” Mr. Friedrich told the Indiana meeting.

“This is roughly the annual rate at which human-induced carbon dioxide is currently increasing,” he stressed at the meeting, which was jointly organized by FAO and the Conservation Technology Information Centre, with the support of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change

  – For more on this story visit

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EU HALTS INCLUSION OF EU ETS FORESTRY CREDITS UNTIL 2020

In its recent communication on deforestation, the European commission announced  that “allowing companies to buy avoided deforestation credits [on the EU ETS] would result in serious imbalances between supply and demand”. The emissions from deforestation are roughly three times greater than the emissions regulated under the EU ETS, the report explained, which could lead to forest credits swamping the carbon market and undermining the price of carbon. However, environmental commissioner Stavros Dimas proposed “testing” the inclusion of deforestation in carbon markets through the establishment of a Global Forest Carbon Mechanism (GFCM) that would compensate tropical countries for reducing their emissions from deforestation. The commission would also consider including forestry credits in the EU ETS for the period after 2020.

  – For more on this story visit

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GLOBAL CARBON MARKET GROWS DESPITE WEAKNESS -SAYS RECENT REPORT

Global markets in carbon emissions permits have grown by 81 percent so far this year and will top $100 billion in 2008, the research company New Carbon Finance estimated on Friday.Growth in the hub of global carbon trading the European Union emissions trading scheme (ETS) masked a fall elsewhere in tradable offsets traded between rich and poor countries under the Kyoto Protocol, and the credit crisis could dent banks' exposure.
Traded value in global carbon markets reached $87 billion in the first nine months of this year, estimated NCF, compared with $64 billion for the whole of 2007.Continuing increases in prices and liquidity would see a global market worth $550 billion by 2012 and over $2 trillion by 2020, estimated the research firm. U.S. adoption of an EU-style cap and trade scheme could see a $3 trillion global market by 2020, it said.
The credit crisis could result in banks cutting the size of their exposure in individual transactions, said Turner."The ITL-CITL link will improve liquidity," he added, referring to a formal link expected this month between trading registries under the EU ETS and the Kyoto Protocol's clean development mechanism (CDM). The value of the primary market in certified emissions reductions (CERs) under the CDM fell 7 percent in the first nine months of this year compared to the same period last year, estimated NCF.That reflected the fact that developers had mopped up the biggest emissions-cutting, eligible CDM projects in the developing world, under the U.N.-led scheme.However, the secondary market in CERs, traded for guaranteed delivery especially in Europe as an alternative carbon emissions permit, continued to grow, more than doubling in value to $10 billion in the first three quarters of 2008 compared to $4 billion for the same period last year.
New Carbon Finance estimates that some $15.8 billion of public and private sector money has been invested in some 107 carbon funds to date.

  – For more on this story visit

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UNDP LAUNCHES NEW INITIATIVE TO HELP NATIONAL GOVERNMENTS TACKLE CLIMATE CHANGE PROBLEMS

The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) has launched a new initiative to help both national governments and local regions strengthen their capacity to deal with the challenges posed by climate change.

The initiative was unveiled at the World Summit of Regions on Climate Change, which was held at the end of October in St. Malo, France.

Under the initiative, developing and emerging economies will receive extra resources to deal with climate change through collaborations with regional authorities in developing countries, and from carbon trading mechanisms.

Christophe Nuttall, director of UNDP’s HUB for Innovative Partnerships, said the current approach to dealing with global warming challenges favoured the development of numerous small, dispersed and fragmented projects.” We believe it would be useful to develop a complementary [and] yet comprehensive integrated local planning framework that involves sub-national governments in the search for solutions,” he said. “These sub-national authorities need to integrate climate and carbon-related constraints in local planning instruments in order to transform their local economies into a vibrant force for sustainable development.”

Yannick Glemarec, UNDP Director for Environment Finance, said the new initiative will help poor communities in developing countries access new funding sources, such as carbon finance, special insurance products and innovative funds for adaptation. “These funds will then be available to communities to channel into public projects that will reduce poverty, improve livelihoods and stimulate economic development,” Mr. Glemarec said.

  – For more on this story visit

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Upcoming Events

17-19 NOVEMBER 2008 CARBON MARKETS AFRICA, TABLE BAY HOTEL, CAPE TOWN, SOUTH AFRICA,

Carbon Markets Africa looks to build on the success of last year providing delegates up-to-date thinking from an expert panel of speakers and allowing ample time for networking and discussion on areas crucial to CDM and the Voluntary Market in Africa.

  – For more information see

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21-23 JANUARY 2009 FIFTH AUSTRIAN JI/CDM WORKSHOP, VIENNA, AUSTRIA

The fifth Austrian JI/CDM Workshop 2009 will be held from 21-23 January 2009 in Vienna. This well established workshop is a get together of project developers, investors, validators and governmental authorities and aims to provide participants with an update about recent developments and future perspectives right after the COP/MOP in Poznan. This is a workshop for companies and institutions. It is a perfect setting to exchange hands on experience and professional know-how from practitioners about technologies, methodologies and country specifics in the JI/CDM market. Around 35 high-level guest speakers will inform the participants on the following key topics:

  - Flexible mechanisms post-2012
 - Green Investment Schemes
 - Project and market-related risks and risk mitigation
 - Innovative project experiences

  – For more information see

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28TH-30TH JANUARY 2009 CONFERENCE ON CONSERVATION SCIENCE AND POLICY, ACCRA, GHANA

The Society for Conservation Biology Africa Section announces a conference on conservation science and policy to be held in Accra, Ghana from January 28 30, 2009. The theme of the conference is "From Conservation Science to Policy in Africa." Starting in September 2008, there will be calls for the submission of abstracts for paper and poster presentations, workshops, and symposia.
Policy issues have become central to conservation biology in Africa, and also attaining the Millennium Development Goal 7, to ensure environmental sustainability [i.e. Integrate the principles of sustainable development into country policies and programmes; reverse loss of environmental resources & reduce biodiversity loss, achieving, by 2010, a significant reduction in the rate of loss].  Additionally, conservation in practice offers opportunities for the livelihoods of vast numbers of poor people in landscapes that support an impressive array of biodiversity.
However, the gap between scientists and policymakers has undermined the potential of conservation to support economic growth and development on the African continent, which this meeting will potentially contribute to. These and other issues led to this conference by the Africa Section, Society for Conservation Biology.

  – For more information see

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Resources & Tools

THE ECOSYSTEM MARKETPLACE STATE OF THE FOREST CARBON MARKETS REPORT AND THE FOREST CARBON PORTAL

Leading up to the UN Climate Negotiations in Poznan, Poland this December, The Ecosystem Marketplace has begun work on a suite of projects concerning the growing—and still contentious— forest carbon markets.  Research is underway for the first State of the Forest Carbon Markets report, modeled after our annual State of the Voluntary Carbon Markets report, both of which are scheduled to be released in the Spring of 2009.  Building on this research, we will be launching a dynamic, searchable database and map of all forest carbon projects currently generating credits around the globe.  The database will reside on a new informational website—temporarily known as the Forest Carbon Portal—that we hope will become the “one-stop shop” for information on the emerging forest carbon markets, both voluntary and regulated. Together, these elements will inform, connect, and mobilize stakeholders (from climate negotiators to investors to community-focused NGOs) on the latest forest carbon market opportunities, challenges, methodologies, readiness efforts, and policy.  For more information, contact Allison Shapiro (ashapiro@ecosystemmarketplace.com or visit www.ecosystemmarketplace.com)

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FOREST TRENDS CHESAPEAKE FUND


Forest Trends has launched the Chesapeake Fund, a regional water quality initiative that is creating a model for reducing nitrogen and other nutrient pollution and “dead zones” worldwide. The Fund will establish a voluntary nitrogen offset market that invests private dollars in on-the-ground pollution reduction projects. Forest Trends believes that if the viability of this market-based tool can be successfully demonstrated in a large, multi-state watershed like the Chesapeake Bay, then its adoption by other regions throughout the world will be rapid.

The UN’s Millennium Ecosystem Assessment labeled oxygen-deficient dead zones a greater threat to humanity than global warming.  Found in the Gulf of Mexico, the mouth of the Yangtze River basin, Europe’s Black Sea, and in a total of 150 areas worldwide, dead zones are areas where an excess of nutrient runoff from agriculture makes life for most creatures impossible, with huge economic impacts to fisheries, tourism, recreation, etc. 

The Chesapeake Fund is a collaborative partnership with the Chesapeake Bay Foundation, World Resources Institute, and partners at the University of Maryland). The Chesapeake Fund Advisory Board has also been created to help guide the further development of the Fund.  The fund plans to initiate the first projects by early 2009, taking steps towards investing in on-the-ground nitrogen reduction projects to improve water quality in the Bay.  For more information, contact Dan Nees (dnees@ forest-trends.org).

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UNDP CLIMATE CHANGE PROFILES FOR DEVELOPING COUNTRIES‏

The UNDP and the School of Geography and Environment at Oxford University have generated country-level studies of climate observations and multi-model projections for 52 developing countries.
 
For each of the 52 countries, a report contains a set of maps and diagrams illustrating the observed and projected climates of that country as country-average time series' as well as maps depicting changes on a 2.5° grid, and summary tables of the data.
A narrative summarises the data in the figures, and placing it in the context of the country's general climate.
 
A dataset for each country containing the underlying observed and model data in text format is also made available, through the website above, for use in further research.

  – To view the profiles see

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New Publications

MAPPING ECOSYSTEM MARKETS: THE MATRIX; FOREST TRENDS; 2008

Over the last decade, there has been a diverse array of efforts around the globe to value and pay for ecosystem services.  Some of these efforts are already channeling billions of dollars into projects and others are less developed, which makes it difficult to get a clear sense of the big picture of these markets.  ‘The Matrix’ is an effort to provide that big picture quite literally in a poster-sized spreadsheet of major ecosystem service markets, with accompanying market profiles.  The Matrix summarizes information that we have collected on Payments for Ecosystem Services (PES) programs around the world including their key characteristics (size, environmental impact, community impact, market participants, etc).  It is hoped that The Matrix will be updated at least every year and will help guide the many different stakeholders through this rapidly changing landscape.

  – To download the matrix visit

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ECOSYSTEM MARKETPLACE SERIES ON WATER QUALITY TRADING

Over the summer, Ecosystem Marketplace stepped up its editorial coverage with in-depth coverage of water quality trading.  A series of articles on water quality trading featured eight stories covering the basics of water quality trading, criticism and evolution of regulatory and voluntary trading in the U.S., and case studies from Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Uganda. A special publication of the same series was produced for the regional Katoomba Group meeting in Tanzania.

  – To read the series visit

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FOREST TRENDS' SPECIAL ISSUE OF MARINE ECOSYSTEMS AND MANAGEMENT (MEAM)

Forest Trends’ Marine Ecosystem Services Program has worked to assess the feasibility of integrating water quality markets that begin with freshwater/watersheds and extend to the coastal zone, with a focus on the Chesapeake watershed, and has published a special issue of MEAM (Marine Ecosystems and Management) on the subject

  – To read the issue visit

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FOREST CARBON STANDARDS

This report, by researcher Eduard Merger from Germany’s Albert-Ludwigs University and the University of Canterbury in New Zealand, is a practical examination of the nuts and bolts of four leading third-party standards for forest carbon projects, intended to give their developers a detailed comparative picture of their options for the verification of their carbon, social and other environmental benefits and impacts. The report looks at the Voluntary Carbon Standard’s (VCS) AFOLU program, the Climate, Community and Biodiversity Standard (CCBS), CarbonFix Standard (CFS) and the Plan Vivo Systems and Standard. It also includes a survey of 71 project developers representing 260 forestry projects. The study reveals that project developers must do their homework in matching the right standard to their activities. There are significant differences in approach among the emerging group of offset kitemarks and this also has implications for the buyers of the resulting credits.

  – To download the report visit

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FARM-LEVEL ADAPTATION TO CLIMATE CHANGE IN ETHIOPIA AND SOUTH AFRICA

The International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) has released several briefs and full-length papers on farmer adaptation strategies to climate change in Ethiopia and South Africa, and their implications for policies at the national, regional, and local levels. The nine briefs concisely lay out results and policy implications based on farmer vulnerability, water management, and the best ways to integrate climate change adaptation into overall development policy. The new papers go into depth on measuring farmers’ vulnerability to climate change in Ethiopia, farmer adaptation to drought in South Africa’s Limpopo River basin, and analyzing farmers’ adaption methods in Ethiopia’s Nile River basin, and have been developed with partners at CEEPA, South Africa; EDRI, Ethiopia; and EEA/EEPRI, Ethiopia, among others. The research is part of the German government-funded project Food and Water Security under Global Change, and is associated with the CGIAR Challenge Program on Water and Food. The project will conclude in late 2008 with two final workshops in Ethiopia and South Africa. These and other materials related to climate change can be found on IFPRI’s Climate Change website, which is part of its overall work on Global Change and Natural Resources.

  – To download the briefs and papers visit

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NEWSLETTERS

We invite you to look at the Katoomba Group’s other newsletters.

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