East and Southern Africa Katoomba Group
Having trouble reading this email? Click Here to view the posted version.
December 22, 2009

FROM THE EDITOR

Dear Katoomba Members,
 
 Welcome to this End of Year edition of the East and Southern Africa Katoomba Group e-newsletter.  
Our newsletter aims to keep our readers aware of the latest news and events relating to payments for ecosystem services (PES) around the world. We welcome your feedback, comments and suggestions, including any articles that you may wish to share with our readers. Please send them by e-mail to aruhweza@forest-trends.org
 

Let me take this opportunity to wish you a very Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year.


Yours sincerely
 
Alice Ruhweza
Coordinator, East and Southern Africa Katoomba Group


 Follow us on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/ESAKatoomba

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

1. ESA Katoomba News

2. New PES Related News from the Region

3. News from Across the Ocean

4. Other Related News

5. Upcoming Events

6. Resources & Tools

7. New Publications

ESA Katoomba News

FOREST TRENDS/KATOOMBA GROUP IN COPENHAGEN

On Saturday December 12, 2009, Forest Trends and the Katoomba Group hosted a side event at COP 15 
focused on the role that indigenous peoples and local communities can play in developing carbon projects and policy. The side event follows a landmark legal opinion by Baker & McKenzie which concluded that the Surui and, by extension, other indigenous peoples in Brazil have clear carbon ownership rights in their demarcated territories based on a detailed review of the Brazilian legislation. Forest Trends commissioned this legal review from Baker & McKenzie as part of the technical capacity they, and their partners Kanindé, IDESAM, and Amazon Conservation Team, are providing for the Surui to develop and implement their REDD project. Forest Trends hopes this work can help demonstrate that not only the territorial rights of the Brazilian indigenous peoples are strengthened with the recognition of their stewardship role of massive carbon stocks, but that governments in other countries also recognize the critical contribution their indigenous populations have towards the conservation of local forests and their ecosystem services, granting the legal demarcation of their traditional territories. Panelists at the side event included Almir Suruí, Chief of the Suruí people, Rebecca Moore of Google, Tony Brunello, Deputy Secretary for Climate Change and the Environment for the State of California, representatives from Fundación Amigos de la Naturaleza Bolivia, La Confederación Nacional de Pueblos Indígenas de Bolivia (CIDOB), and Instituto Socioambiental (ISA) as well as the Jane Goodall Institute.

Forest Trends was also involved with a consortium of other NGO's (IPAM, Woodshole, The Nature Conservancy, Rainforest Alliance) in developing an official submission to the IPCC about the role of responsible forestry in reducing carbon emissions.
 

  – For more on this story and to read the legal review visit

<<BACK TO TOP

New PES Related News from the Region

KASIGAU REDD PROJECT IN KENYA BECOMES THE FIRST IN AFRICA TO ACHIEVE CCB GOLD VALIDATION


On December 14th, in the midst of the debate on climate change in Copenhagen, Wildlife Works Carbon, LLC announced that their Kasigau Corridor REDD (Reduced Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation) Project in Kenya had been awarded the first GOLD level validation in Africa, under the Climate Community and Biodiversity (CCB) Alliance's REDD Standard. In addition they have entered into a contract with a major South African bank, Nedbank, to sell the Voluntary Emission Reductions (VERs) generated by the project.


The Wildlife Works REDD project brings substantial benefits to local communities in education, job creation, environmental protection and direct financial rewards, while protecting precious biodiversity at the same time, and proves that well designed, well managed REDD projects can succeed in
 Africa. This is a milestone in the progress of REDD towards achieving legitimacy in
 the global carbon marketplace, and sets a positive example for those millions of Africans who have the potential to gain financial reward from REDD to help them move forward with sustainable development in the face of massive and growing pressure to their livelihoods caused by climate change. "We believe this demonstrates clearly that REDD is ready for prime time in Africa," says Mike Korchinsky, Wildlife Works' Founder and President.
 



The project was validated by independent verifier Scientific Certification Systems (SCS) against the CCB Standard Second Edition.  SCS conducted both desk and field-based assessment activities and found that, in addition to conforming to the 14 required criteria, the Kasigau Corridor REDD project meets two additional, optional CCB criteria qualifying the project for Gold Level status.  


The Climate, Community and Biodiversity Alliance is the most rigorous standard for ensuring communities and biodiversity benefit from climate change projects. The Project will also seek validation and verification under the Voluntary Carbon Standard (VCS). Wildlife Works Carbon is a new venture of Wildlife Works, Inc. a global leader in applying innovative market based solutions to the conservation of biodiversity.


  – For more information visit

<<BACK TO TOP

THE UGANDA GOVERNMENT, THE WELSH ASSEMBLY GOVERNMENT, UNDP & DFID LAUNCH THE MBALE TERRITORIAL APPROACH TO CLIMATE CHANGE PROJECT

At Copenhagen on Tuesday 15th December, Welsh Environment Minister Jane Davidson announced a new deal between the Welsh Assembly Government and the Mbale region of Uganda to help prepare the area for the impacts of climate change. The Mbale Territorial Approach to Climate Change project is a three-year partnership between Wales, the Mbale region of Uganda, the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and the DFID.


The Wales/Mbale partnership is one of five pilot projects, which link regions in the developed world with those in the developing world. The project will help Mbale both understand what climate change means for them and help them take the actions to enable them to cope. Most people in the region are subsistence farmers whose livelihoods are acutely sensitive to the changes in the weather that they have seen in recent years. Coffee is the region’s biggest export, providing a livelihood for thousands of people. If temperatures in the area rise by just 2˚C, then they will be unable to grow the crop. Industrialised countries have a moral duty to help these regions prepare their own plans to adapt and prepare for our changing environment.One of the first projects under the scheme will be to work with a Fair-trade Coffee Co- Op in Mbale to run a tree nursery. The trees will provide much needed shade to lower the temperature for the coffee plants of 6,000 farmers whilst absorbing carbon from the atmosphere.


The Welsh Assembly Government has set an ambitious target of cutting carbon emissions 3% per year from 2011 onwards in areas it controls, enabling an 80% reduction before 2050. By 2020, we expect emissions in Wales to have reduced by at least 40%.


The Territorial Approach to Climate Change (TACC) programme will assist sub-national authorities (regions and states) in developing countries to design and implement their climate change strategies and investment plans.The DFID is providing £100,000 pa for the initiative to match £75,000 from the Welsh Assembly Government and £50,000 from the Wales based Waterloo Foundation.

  – For more information visit

<<BACK TO TOP

News from Across the Ocean

YASUNI PARK TRUST FUND WILL KEEP ECUADOR'S OIL UNDERGROUND

Ecuador's initiative to protect the climate and the rainforest of Yasuni National Park by leaving its largest oil reserve in the ground will be supported by a new multi-donor trust fund to offset lost oil revenue. The Yasuni Trust Fund will be managed by the UN Development Programme. It will focus on reducing carbon dioxide emissions by permanently foregoing extraction of fossil fuels from the park; developing alternative energy; protecting indigenous groups; and reducing poverty and inequality through sustainable social development. In exchange for keeping the crude oil in the ground in the Ishpingo, Tampococha, Tiputini (ITT) region, the Ecuadorian government has asked for compensation of $350 million a year for 10 years. 


The initiative aims to prevent the extraction of an estimated 850 million barrels of crude oil in the ground beneath the park. This would prevent the release of 407 million metric tonnes of carbon dioxide and would also protect the indigenous peoples and unique plants and animals that inhabit the park. The park is designated as a UNESCO Biosphere Reserve and is home to indigenous peoples who live in voluntary isolation to protect their way of life..


Covering nearly 2.5 million acres of primary tropical rainforest at the intersection of the Andes, the Amazon and the equator, Yasuni National Park was created in 1979. It is the ancestral territory of the Woarani people, and two other indigenous tribes living in voluntary isolation, the Tagaeri and the Taramenane. Described by scientists such as Dr. Jane Goodall and Dr. E.O. Wilson as one of the world's most biologically important tropical rainforests, Yasuni is critical habitat to 23 globally threatened mammal species, including the giant otter, the Amazonian manatee, the pink river the giant anteater, and the Amazonian tapir. Ten primate species live in the Yasuni, including the threatened white-bellied spider monkey, together with a wealth of unique birds. As a result of its unique location, Yasuni contains what are thought to be the greatest variety of tree and insect species anywhere on the planet. In just 2.5 acres, there are as many tree species as in all of the United States and Canada combined.


Oil extraction from Yasuni started several decades ago by Texaco, followed by many other foreign oil companies and is said to have caused pollution of the land and rivers, deforestation, and disease and deaths of thousands of inhabitants poisoned by the toxic water seeping into the Amazon rivers, and by the polluted fish and animals which they eat. The new initiative and trust fund aims to put an end to such destructive oil exploration and development operations. The government has launched a countrywide campaign to raise small donations from civil society. The fund will also accept private and public sector donations, debt swaps, carbon bonds issued in the voluntary carbon market for avoided CO2 emissions, and direct investment in specific government development projects, which would have been financed by ITT oil revenues.The Ecuadorian government has received many international offers of support. On June 26, the German parliament unanimously approved a resolution backing the initiative and committing the government and Chancellor Angela Merkel to financially and politically support of the initiative, as well as promoting it among EU countries and the Club of Paris. Additional support has come from the Spanish government, which contributed an initial $4 million dollars towards Yasuni conservation.

  – For more information visit

<<BACK TO TOP

Other Related News

BRIGHT REDD SPOT IN OTHERWISE DISMAL COPENHAGEN ACCORD

Adopted from the Ecosystem Marketplace and ICTSD


“We recognize the crucial role of reducing emission from deforestation and forest degradation and the need to enhance removals of greenhouse gas emission by forests and agree on the need to provide positive incentives to such actions through the immediate establishment of a mechanism including REDD-plus, to enable the mobilization of financial resources from developed countries.”



That’s the good news on REDD from the otherwise disappointing Copenhagen Accord, which was recognized in the wee hours of Saturday morning by delegates to COP 15 in Copenhagen after being put forward by the US, China, India and South Africa and supported by the Coalition of Rainforest Nations but shunned by many island states and African nations.

The United Nations climate change conference narrowly avoided a complete catastrophe after two weeks of acrimonious negotiations, when a select handful of leaders hammered out a political agreement behind closed doors on Friday night, while around a hundred of their counterparts sat in another room. Despite achieving agreement among the major economies - also known as the “major emitters” - whose buy-in holds the key to addressing climate change, the agreement reached in Copenhagen is insufficient to resolve the most critical elements that will stabilize the atmosphere, protect vulnerable communities from harm, and ensure the continued sustainable development of developing countries.


 The three-page “Copenhagen Accord“, spearheaded by the United States, China, India, Brazil and South Africa, is not a politically binding agreement, as Parties originally intended when they set out together on the Road to Copenhagen two years ago at COP 14. In effect, the Accord is a political statement of a few, supported by some, and not accepted by others. The Accord concedes that the world needs to curb global warming from rising above 2 degrees Celsius from pre-industrial times, although it does not specify deeper emissions cuts for developed countries - a key factor for avoiding the 2 degrees limit. Notably, a majority of the 193 signatories to the UN climate convention - those represented in the Alliance of Small Island States (AOSIS), the Least Developed Countries (LDCs) and the Africa Group - have all warned that 1.5 degrees is the absolute limit and that 2 degrees will mean hardship, mass migrations, and even death for many of their citizens. The Accord affirms a commitment of US$30 billion in funding over the next three years to assist developing countries with their mitigation and adaptation, and sets a goal of US$100 billion in annual funding by 2020. However, the level of funding aspired to falls far short of the sums calculated by entities such as the World Bank, McKinsey, and the United Nations Development Program, among others, to address adaptation and mitigation. In addition, the fund will include an undetermined share of both public and private financing, with no certainty of reaching the level and, perhaps more importantly, does not guarantee the much needed sustainable financing or the ease of access that developing countries require.


A final element of the Copenhagen Accord that presented the most difficulty is the issue of reporting and transparency of emissions reductions. The final result was that mitigation actions taken independent of international support would be reported only through National Communications - a standard reporting tool under the UNFCCC for developing countries - every two years. Mitigation actions carried out with international support will be entered in a registry and are subject to international measurement, reporting and verification. Notably, securing these transparency tools cost the US the reference to the “50% global cut by 2050′ that was initially in the agreement. The implications of these requirements will surely come to light as the LCA process advances and the political guidance from the Accord begins to weigh in on definition of the LCA text.


Among the Decisions of the COP, Parties were able to agree to continue the negotiating process of the Ad-hoc Working Groups on Long-term Cooperative Action (LCA) and on the Kyoto Protocol into next year. Notably, a proposal to hold permanent negotiations in Geneva, Switzerland, for the coming year received some support. This format would resemble that of other complex international negotiations, and is favored by many developing countries because it would allow them to access support from their permanent missions in Geneva, where many have standing economic, social and environmental negotiating capacity.




  – For more details on the Accord visit

<<BACK TO TOP

ALGERIA, EGYPT, JORDON, MOROCCO AND TUNISIA TO BENEFIT FROM $750M FOR SOLAR IN NORTH AFRICA, MIDDLE EAST 


Eleven concentrated solar projects in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) are set to receive $750 million from the World Bank, which it said could help unlock a further $4.85 billion in financing from other sources. Concentrated solar power (CSP) projects use lenses and mirrors to focus sunlight from a large area into a beam, producing heat that can be used in electricity generation.


The total cost of building all 11 projects would be around $5.5 billion, the World Bank said. They would have a combined capacity of 900MW by 2020 and cut emissions by at least 1.7 million tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent a year.  In addition, the proposal would see the World Bank help finance two transmission lines which would allow electricity generated in the MENA region to be exported to Europe. These would connect Tunisia to Italy and Jordan to the eastern Mediterranean. The initiative would leverage energy diversification, while promoting Euro-Mediterranean integration to the benefit of MENA countries that will be able to exploit one of the major untapped sources of energy.


The five countries were chosen because they are where “transformational outcomes are most likely”, the draft said. Algeria, for example, has a target to source 20% of power generation from renewables by 2030, and expects to meet 70% of this goal through CSP.


  – For more details on the story visit

<<BACK TO TOP

Upcoming Events

KATOOMBA XVI, USA

FEBRUARY 9 -10, 2010

PALO, ALTO, CALIFORNIA, USA


This first-ever Marine Katoomba Meeting capitalizes on ever-expanding interest in finding innovative solutions to conserve our valuable marine ecosystem services. 


OBJECTIVES


    * To catalyze the building of a global community of practice to support payment for ecosystem services (PES) and other innovative financing mechanisms for marine and coastal conservation, as well as regional networks for information exchange and sharing of lessons learned;
    * To create a strategy to reach consensus on a “blueprint for action” to guide future marine PES, offsets, and other market-based solutions to marine conservation problems;
    * To lay the groundwork for designing and launching a network of demonstration PES projects in marine and coastal environments; and
    * To present meeting outputs at future national and international oceans conferences, such as the Fifth Global Conference on Oceans, Coasts, and Islands.   

 
TOPICS TO BE COVERED


•    The current state of market-based mechanisms for marine and coastal conservation
•    PES and other market-like mechanisms in an integrated ecosystem management context, including adding value to tourism with targeted investments in coral reef and mangrove protection; linking freshwater quality markets with coastal water quality; innovative market strategies in fisheries; sustainable offshore energy development
•    The role of community and other institutions in providing innovative solutions for marine and coastal conservation
•    Solving the open access issues in marine and coastal resource utilization
•    Exploring various rights-based approaches to emerging marine market schemes
•    Transboundary collaboration on environment, trade, and PES
•    Extending terrestrial carbon markets to cover marine and coastal carbon pools
•    Enabling conditions for marine markets through creating the right conditions for private sector investment
•    Responsible investing, and marketing opportunities for industries supporting coastal and marine conservation


Join us to hear about the state of market-based solutions for marine and coastal conservation, the challenges of developing marine markets; potential institutional and policy solutions for overcoming them, the implications of emerging policies for maritime industries, and to strategize on how to realize the great potential of market-based mechanisms for conserving marine ecosystems and their services.

  – For more information and registration please visit

<<BACK TO TOP

SECOND ALL-AFRICA CARBON FORUM

3TH – 5TH MARCH 2010

NAIROBI, KENYA


The Second all-Africa Carbon Forum will include a conference, trade fair and capacity development to demonstrate the potential for clean development mechanism (CDM) projects in Africa. The forum is being organized by the UNFCCC Secretariat, the UN Environment Programme (UNEP), the UN Development Programme (UNDP), the World Bank, the UN Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD), the UN Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR) and the International Emissions Trading Association (IETA).

  – For more information please visit

<<BACK TO TOP

AFRICAN MINISTERIAL CONFERENCE ON WEATHER, CLIMATE AND WATER INFORMATION

12TH – 16TH APRIL 2010;

NAIROBI, KENYA


This meeting is organized by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) in partnership with the African Union (AU). African Ministers responsible for meteorology will meet to address ways of strengthening weather, climate and water information for decision making.

  – For more information please visit

<<BACK TO TOP

Resources & Tools

UN HELPS LAUNCH FOREST MONITORING SYSTEM TO TACKLE CLIMATE CHANGE

A new and free way to monitor the size and health of forests through satellite data and help curb greenhouse gas emissions from deforestation and forest degradation has been launched by the United Nations Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) and its partners.The new system delivers data for 13,000 locations and provides tools for their interpretation.


Nearly 20 per cent of global greenhouse gas emissions – more than all the world’s cars, trucks, ships and planes combined – result from deforestation and degradation of forests, and plans to slash these emissions .One challenge is the need for measurement, reporting and verification systems of carbon to ensure that carbon accounting and payments are carried out transparently. National monitoring systems must be enhanced, not just looking at carbon dynamics but also measuring multiple benefits of UN-REDD and drivers of deforestation.

  – For more details on the story visit

<<BACK TO TOP

IPCC LAUNCHES CLIMATE EDUCATION PROGRAMME

At a side event held during the UN Copenhagen Climate Change Conference, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) launched its Climate Education Programme, which draws on the money received for the Nobel Peace Prize. The Programme aims to strengthen the ability of developing and Least Developed Countries to contribute to climate science and research. Scholarships will be awarded to young scholars from developing and Least Developed Countries, small island States and those regions worst hit by droughts, floods, famine and changed patterns of precipitation. The first round of scholarships will be awarded for the second term of the academic year 2010-2011 and the call for proposals will be posted on the IPCC website

  – Programme leaflet is available online at

<<BACK TO TOP

New Publications

MARKETS FOR ECOSYSTEM SERVICES IN CHINA

Published by Forest Trends (Michael T. Bennett)

  – Available online at

<<BACK TO TOP

"CLIMATE CHANGE, DISASTER, DISPLACEMENT AND MIGRATION: INITIAL EVIDENCE FROM AFRICA"

Published by the UN High Commissioner of Refugees

  – Available online at

<<BACK TO TOP

A GLOBAL GREEN NEW DEAL - FOR REDUCING GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS WITHOUT SACRIFICING DEVELOPMENT


  – Available online at

<<BACK TO TOP

___________________________________

NEWSLETTERS

We invite you to look at the Katoomba Group’s other newsletters.

<<BACK TO TOP