East and Southern Africa Katoomba Group
Having trouble reading this email? Click Here to view the posted version.
November, 2011

FROM THE EDITOR

Dear Colleagues,


Forest Trends, ICRAF-PRESA, the Katoomba Group, and UNDP welcome you to our e-newsletter on Payments for Ecosystem Services (PES) in East and Southern Africa. This online resource was created to offer easy access to new developments on PES in Africa and around the world.


Among other themes, this newsletter highlights new PES implementation tools relevant within and beyond the East and Southern Africa context. ICRAF-PRESA demonstrates a new approach to planning PES schemes, by using market research to discover landholder preferences. Another tool from ICRAF and partners utilizes Google Earth to help tree-planters decide which species to plant. Legal and policy frameworks to facilitate PES in Kenya and carbon rights in Ghana are explored. Tools to assess site-level ecosystem services, social, and biodiversity impacts of both PES and REDD+ were also introduced from EcoMetrix and Forest Trends.


Please see our contact information at the bottom of this newsletter and feel free to contact us with questions. We look forward to receiving any comments or article suggestions for our next edition. Thank you for your readership!


Yours sincerely,


The Editors

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

1. East and Southern Africa News

2. Africa News

3. Global News

4. Resources, Tools and Publications

5. Other Related News

6. About the Editors

East and Southern Africa News

INNOVATIVE MARKET RESEARCH FOR ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES

14 October, 2011, PRESA


Little is known about landholder attitudes and preferences related to alternative land management schemes. PRESA researchers employed market research techniques to find out how landholders prefer a PES scheme to work at the Kapingazi River basin in Kenya.

  – Click Here to Read More

<<BACK TO TOP

DO KENYA ENVIRONMENT POLICIES ALLOW PES?

14 October, 2011, PRESA


Implementing a PES scheme for watershed services in Kenya faces several policy hurdles. Kenya’s environment policies do not specifically mention PES in natural resource management. This creates a policy limbo as regulators and potential private-sector buyers are not sure about getting involved in PES schemes.

  – Click Here to Read More

<<BACK TO TOP

WORKSHOP HIGHLIGHTS CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES IN PES

Payments for environmental services target communities whose economic activities have a direct impact on environmental resources and aims at providing them with incentives for protecting the ecosystem. A workshop between ICRAF-PRESA, The Katoomba Group, and UNDP South Africa highlighted how PES could act as an incentive for sustainable use of natural resources. A second workshop focused on the technical aspects of Social Impact Assessment in REDD+ projects. Read a summary here.



  – Click Here to Read More

<<BACK TO TOP

UGANDA PROJECT ACHIEVES CARBON VERIFICATION

A rainforest rehabilitation project in Uganda has become the latest forest carbon project to achieve verification under the Verified Carbon Standard (VCS). Started by Face the Future in 1994, the Natural High Forest rehabilitation project is located in Uganda’s Kibale National Park, home to one of the world’s largest Chimpanzee populations. Implemented by Face the Future, Uganda Wildlife Authority (UWA) and local community members, the project will see the restoration of 10,000 ha of indigenous forest vegetation on degraded lands within the boundaries of the national park. “This project helped pioneer the field of forest carbon offsets,” said Dr. Robert J. Hrubes, Senior Vice President of SCS, who validated and verified the project. “Its validation to the VCS represents a milestone for the voluntary carbon market.” 370,000 Voluntary Carbon Units (VCUs) were issued in September 2011 for the project, which Face the Future hopes to expand in the future.

  – Read More from Face the Future
  – Read More from SCS

<<BACK TO TOP

FROM RURAL UGANDAN SCHOOL TEACHER TO INTERNATIONAL CARBON CONSULTANT

When geography teacher Beatrice Ahimbisibwe and a handful of Ugandan farmers started planting trees to earn carbon credits in 2003, their neighbors thought they were crazy.  Many of those neighbors have since joined her as the handful grew to more than 300 participating in a sophisticated income-sharing arrangement that can serve as a model for similar communities around the world.

  – Click Here to Read More

<<BACK TO TOP

SOUTH AFRICA MOVES TO BEGIN REFLECTING THE ECONOMIC VALUE OF ITS ECOSYSTEMS, BIODIVERSITY

By: Terence Creamer
18th October 2011


Over the coming year, the Department of Environmental Affairs will study the contribution of South Africa’s ecosystems and biodiversity to the economy in a bid to correct for the current “depreciation” of the country’s natural capital in its national accounts.

  – Click Here to Read More

<<BACK TO TOP

Africa News

PROJECT: DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF CONGO ENTERS A NEW ERA

Canada's leading forest carbon project developer, ERA Ecosystem Restoration Associates, and the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) government have signed a contract for the country’s first concession for a REDD project.  This contract follows recent commitments from the DRC government to curb deforestation and the signing of a Carbon Rights Agreement with ERA in March. ERA have already announced that the project will be developed in line with the VCS and CCBA standards with early predictions suggesting carbon emissions reductions in the realm of between 1.5 to 3 million tons in the future. Read more about the concession agreement from the ERA website.

  – Click Here to Read More

<<BACK TO TOP

GHANA TO DEVELOP LEGAL FRAMEWORK FOR CARBON RIGHTS

The Ghanaian government has announced a new commitment to sustainable forest management that will be set out in a law aimed at securing resource tenure. Land tenure has been a core discussion point within the REDD+ space as it becomes increasingly clear that projects and carbon rights can only be developed if relevant tenure disputes have been resolved. There is still a long way to go on securing tenure rights, but a bill before Parliament is a first step in addressing some long standing forest management obstacles in Ghana. Read more from the Ghana News Agency here. 

  – Click Here to Read More

<<BACK TO TOP

CONGO REFUELS PLANTATION DEBATE

The Republic of Congo has announced an afforestation/reforestation project of degraded forest land which will increase the national forest cover up from 65 to 70%. The government is currently shopping for investors, hoping to get around $2.6 billion from international donors for the project. Yet questions remain about how environmentally friendly this initiative actually is, especially as the 5% increase in forest cover will come from plantation crops of native and exotic species. Environmentalists have been quick to highlight that plantations do not conserve biodiversity and will actually reduce carbon storage even compared to an area of degraded forest.

  – Click Here to Read More

<<BACK TO TOP

WORKSHOPS ON REDD+ IN DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF CONGO

In September, Forest Trends and The Katoomba Group also held four training sessions for project managers and policy makers in the Democratic Republic of Congo on: steps to designing forest carbon projects, (SBIA)  in REDD+ projects, ‘nested’ policy frameworks, and a scoping of national REDD opportunities in DRC.

  – Click Here to Read More

<<BACK TO TOP

Global News

PHARMACEUTICAL COMPANIES FACE BIODIVERSITY RISK

The world’s leading pharmaceutical companies are exposed to risks from their reliance and impact on biodiversity, says a new study launched today. The study by KPMG and the Natural Value Initiative (NVI), titled Biodiversity and ecosystem services: Risk and opportunity analysis within the pharmaceutical sector, reveals the potential business risks facing the pharmaceutical industry from its reliance and impact on natural resources.

  – Click Here to Read More

<<BACK TO TOP

PROGRAMS IN RWANDA AND GAMBIA AWARDED FOR FOREST PROTECTION

The UN has announced gold and silver awards for sustainable forest management. Rwanda won the gold Future Policy Award for its native species reforestation program, agroforestry incentives and environmental education initiatives which have increased national forest cover by 37% since 1990. Gambia won a silver award for its Community Forestry Policy,  the first in Africa to secure permanent forest ownership rights for local people.

  – Click Here to Read More

<<BACK TO TOP

Resources, Tools and Publications

CHALLENGES OF REDD+ ON THE AFRICAN CONTINENT

September/October 2011

The South African Journal of Science.


The REDD+ mechanism offers developing countries: an opportunity to offset their carbon emission levels, financial benefits through trading of REDD+ offset credits, improved livelihood of local people adjacent to forests, and contributions towards biodiversity conservation. Despite these potential benefits, there are challenges associated with the development and implementation of REDD+ mechanisms on the African continent.

  – Click Here to Read More

<<BACK TO TOP

ECOSYSTEM SERVICES CERTIFICATION, OPPORTUNITIES AND CONSTRAINTS

CIFOR website, September 2011


A major challenge in trading ecosystem services is the need to quantify and commoditise services, for monitoring and verification as well as for trade. This is relatively straightforward for goods such as forest honey or shade-grown coffee, but potentially complex for services such as water purification, reducing risk from floods and other disasters or carbon sequestration.


  – Click Here to Read More

<<BACK TO TOP

LINKING SCIENTIFIC KNOWLEDGE WITH POLICY ACTION IN NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

The ASB Partnership, September 2011


Forest margins are not just a constellation of tree species, but are social spaces where stakeholders contest over many issues, and use their knowledge, values and representations to plan and justify their actions. Boundary organizations play an important role in bridging the gap between policy and science.


  – Click Here to Read More

<<BACK TO TOP

THE RIGHT TREE FOR THE RIGHT PLACE

The Community Forum, August 2011


A new tool uses Google Earth to help tree-planters decide which species to plant, based on native or historical vegetation.  ‘Useful Trees Species for Africa’ provides available information on indigenous species, including potential to provide food - such as edible fruits or vegetables - medicine, wood products - such as timber, beehives, or utensils - or environmental services - such as soil improvement, windbreaks, or shade. The tool was developed by the World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF) and Forest and Landscape Denmark under the UNEP-GEF Carbon Benefits Project, which establishes ways to enable carbon stocks and greenhouse gas emissions to be measured and modeled under present as well as more sustainable management.

  – Click Here to Read More

<<BACK TO TOP

FREE COPIES OF SUSTAINABLE LAND MANAGEMENT AND CLIMATE CHANGE VIDEO SERIES

The Community Forum, August 2011


The International Institute for Environment and Development and the Centre for International Cooperation Universities are offering free copies of a new DVD on Sustainable Land Management Technologies for Climate Change Adaptation in Africa.  The mini-films showcase two technologies with documented success in Africa - Stone Lines and Fanya Juu - from construction, design specifications and input requirements to examples of mature systems and farmer perspectives. 

  – Email IIED to Request a Copy

<<BACK TO TOP

INNOVATIVE TOOL PROVIDES DEVELOPMENT ALTERNATIVES

28 July 2011, Hannah Kett


EcoMetrix was designed to evaluate site-level impacts of new development instead of looking at impacts from a landscape-level context. It works by modeling and measuring the positive and negative impacts that a proposed development will have on the site’s landscape and ecosystem services. The tool is built to provide the evaluation of a variety of scenarios, allowing developers to compare the impacts of different development alternatives. Within the context of EcoMetrix, the ecosystem includes the natural and human environment as well as the economy.

  – Click Here to Read More

<<BACK TO TOP

STACKING ECOSYSTEM SERVICES PAYMENTS: RISKS AND SOLUTIONS

July 2011, Cooley and Olander


A wide variety of incentive programs and markets have arisen to pay landowners for ecosystem services--the benefits that healthy ecosystems provide, such as water filtration, biodiversity, habitat protection, and carbon sequestration. This raises questions about whether landowners can receive more than one payment for ecosystem services generated from the same parcel of land, a practice known as "stacking." This paper outlines the different types of ecosystem service credits that can be stacked, and introduces a conceptual framework that can help policy makers and project developers determine whether a stacked project is meeting the objective of replacing or enhancing ecosystem services. It also identifies three specific circumstances in which stacking can lead to a negative outcome for ecosystem services and puts forward specific policy proposals to address these issues.

  – Click Here to Read More

<<BACK TO TOP

FOREST CARBON MARKET REPORT LAUNCHED

After months of investigation and analysis the State of the Forest Carbon Markets 2011: From Canopy to Currency has been released.  This is Ecosystem Marketplace’s second annual report giving readers an in-depth look at what’s happening in today’s market, and what might be happening down the road.

  – To Read More:

<<BACK TO TOP

FPIC IN REDD+

Free, Prior, and Informed Consent in REDD+: Principles and Approaches for Policy and Project Development


This publication is targeted at people concerned with the design and implementation of REDD+ projects or programs. The audience includes independent community facilitators or advisors; indigenous and local community leaders; local government staff; project staff/liaison officers; private sector investors; and NGO facilitators, advocates and activists. It assumes highly literate readers with a basic level of understanding of REDD+ and focuses on the Asia-Pacific region. Divided into three main sections, the publication begins with an overview of REDD+ and the importance of Free, Prior, and Informed Consent (FPIC). Next is a quick reference section that describes the development of a process that respects FPIC and summarizes key information. The final guidelines section provides more detailed information on twelve aspects or ‘elements’ of a generic process to respect the right of indigenous peoples and local communities to FPIC.

  – Click Here to Read More

<<BACK TO TOP

SOCIAL AND BIODIVERSITY IMPACT ASSESSMENT (SBIA) MANUAL FOR REDD+ PROJECTS

Michael Richards, Steven Panfil - Forest Trends, Conservation International


Are land-based carbon projects good for local people, biodiversity, and ecosystem services? The Climate, Community and Biodiversity Alliance (CCBA), Forest Trends, Fauna & Flora International (FFI), and the Rainforest Alliance formed an alliance with the aim of producing a user-friendly Manual on how to conduct cost-effective and credible social and biodiversity impact assessment. The concepts described in this Manual will be relevant to a wide range of site-level land-based carbon activities, whether designed for compliance or voluntary markets (we believe that sub-national activities will continue to have an important role in a future REDD + architecture).

  – Click Here to Read More

<<BACK TO TOP

IMPLICATIONS OF GHANA'S LEGAL AND POLICY FRAMEWORK FOR REDD+

Forest Trends and the Katoomba Group commissioned a report from The Rock and Partners - a leading African law firm on climate change and global warming issues – on implications of Ghana’s current legal and policy framework for REDD+. In parallel to the publication of this report, Nature Conservation Research Centre (NCRC) is leading a peer-review process within Ghana, which is expected to result in updates and revisions based upon input from Ghanaian experts.

  – Click Here to Read More

<<BACK TO TOP

Other Related News

9 JULY 2011: WORKSHOP BRINGS NAGOYA TO WEST AFRICA

Seventh Regional Workshop on Biodiversity and Finance in Support of the Nagoya Outcomes

9 July 2011, Dakar, Senegal


The Global Environment Facility (GEF) and the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) wrapped up a workshop in July in Dakar on biodiversity finance in West Africa. The workshop explored financing options for implementing the Nagoya protocol in the region. Participants discussed estimated funding and capacity-building needs, and reviewed available sources of biodiversity finance, including market-based mechanisms like biodiversity offsets, as well as more traditional government and multilateral funding options. The workshop was part of a series of regionally-focused meetings convened by the GEF and CBD, planning for implementation of the Nagoya compact around the world.

  – Click Here to Read More (Press Release)
  – Click Here to Read More (Regional Workshops)

<<BACK TO TOP

3-7 OCTOBER 2011: NEW UN BODY ON BIODIVERSITY AND ECOSYSTEM SERVICES MEETS IN NAIROBI

Nairobi, Kenya


UN delegates met in Nairobi, Kenya last week as preparations for a new UN body, the Intergovernmental Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) continue. The talks focused on protocols for IPBES' operation. The new platform is modeled on the UNFCCC to coordinate international research on biodiversity loss and effective conservation policies. IISD Reporting Services has summary highlights from the meeting.

  – Click Here to Read More
  – Click Here to Read More on Green Development Certification

<<BACK TO TOP

12 OCTOBER 2011: DIALOGUE OF FORESTS, GOVERNANCE, AND CLIMATE CHANGE

Dialogue of Forests, Governance, and Climate Change, RRI


The 11th “Rights and Resources Initiative Dialogue on Forests, Governance, and Climate Change: Status and role of public and private finance to reduce forest loss and degradation” will take place at the Queen Elizabeth II Conference Centre, London, on 12 October 2011. The Dialogue aims to examine what needs to be done to ensure that REDD+ finance is sustainable, accountable, fair and effective. The meeting will discuss the current state of public and private financial mechanisms for REDD+ and adaptation, aiming to contribute to developing an updated vision for the optimal design and deployment of finance to reduce forest loss and degradation using approaches that ensure full respect for the rights and development of indigenous peoples and forest-dependent communities. The Dialogue will facilitate the sharing of relevant emerging lessons, experiences and perspectives among indigenous leaders, community representatives, policy makers, and organizations working in the field.

  – Click Here to Read More

<<BACK TO TOP

10-12 NOVEMBER 2011: INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PES

PES and their Institutional Dimensions: International conference on PES

10 - 12 November 2011, Berlin Germany


The international conference focuses on the institutional frameworks and governance structures of PES schemes in both, developing and industrialized countries. A field trip to visit a PES scheme in practice in Brandenburg is organised for Saturday, November 12th. Facilitators of the conference are the research group CIVILand headed by Dr. Bettina Matzdorf (Leibniz-Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research (ZALF)) in cooperation with Prof Dr. Stefanie Engel (Professorship of Environmental Policy and Economics, ETH Zurich) and Prof. Dr. Thomas Koellner (Professorship of Ecological Services, University of Bayreuth). Venue is the Representation of Brandenburg with the Federal Government located in the city center of Berlin, Germany. A publication of selected articles in a special issue of Ecological Economics is planned.

  – Click Here to Read More

<<BACK TO TOP

About the Editors

CONTRIBUTING ORGANIZATIONS

       

 

 

 

 



<<BACK TO TOP

___________________________________

NEWSLETTERS

We invite you to look at the Katoomba Group’s other newsletters.

<<BACK TO TOP