East and Southern Africa Katoomba Group
Having trouble reading this email? Click Here to view the posted version.
July 27, 2010

FROM THE EDITOR

Dear Katoomba Members,
 
Greetings and welcome to the July edition of the East and Southern Africa Katoomba Group e-newsletter. Our newsletter aims to keep our readers aware of the latest news and events relating to payments for ecosystem services (PES) around the world. This issue especially highlights two key Katoomba publications: the REDD Opportunities Scoping Exercise (ROSE) synthesis report and the Social Impact Assessment Manual Version 1.0. We welcome your feedback, comments and suggestions, including any articles that you may wish to share with our readers. Please send them by e-mail to snamirembe@forest-trends.org
 
Yours sincerely,
Sara Namirembe

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

1. ESA Katoomba News

2. New PES Related News from the Region

3. News from Across the Ocean

4. Other Related News

5. Upcoming Events

6. Resources & Tools

7. New Publications

ESA Katoomba News

FOREST TRENDS HAS PUBLISHED A SYNTHESIS REPORT OF THE REDD+ OPPORTUNITIES SCOPING EXCISE FOR UGANDA, TANZANIA AND GHANA

The REDD+ Opportunities Scoping Exercise (ROSE) is a tool for classifying and prioritizing potential REDD+ sub-national activities and for assessing critical constraints to project development, especially those associated with the legal, political, and institutional framework for carbon finance.  The ROSE tool was developed and refined during 2009 in the course of conducting case studies in Tanzania, Uganda, and Ghana. The tool has two main stages: a 2-3 day key informant or expert workshop, and an analysis of policy, legal and institutional constraints by a small in-country team following the workshop. In the first stage, workshop participants work through a set of steps aimed at identifying high potential REDD+ ‘project types’ and the main legal, political, and institutional ‘gaps’ constraining development of the identified project types. The ROSE tool is therefore relevant to the development of REDD+ at both the sub-national and national levels; in the three case study countries, the ROSE studies have provided key inputs to national ‘REDD+ Readiness’ processes. This report explains the ROSE methodology and process, and summarizes key findings of the three case studies, including a brief description of the high potential project types identified, and the main gaps or constraints to realising that potential.   

  – Read More:

<<BACK TO TOP

MANUAL FOR SOCIAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT OF LAND-BASED CARBON PROJECTS PUBLISHED†

Forest Trends, the Climate, Community and Biodiversity Alliance (CCBA), Rainforest Alliance and Fauna & Flora International (FFI) have published Version 1.0 of a “Manual for Social Impact Assessment of Land-Based Carbon Projects.”
The Manual can be accessed at http://www.forest-trends.org/publications.php.
The Manual is designed to be used by carbon project proponents aiming for validation under the CCB Standards, or other multiple-benefit carbon standards.  The NGOs involved in this initiative believe that a combination of credible social impact assessment methods and robust standards for verifying the co-benefits provides an important way of promoting positive social outcomes of land based carbon projects, and avoiding negative ones.
The Manual is Version 1.0 since it will be ‘field-tested’ over the rest of 2010, and based on user experience, peer review, and other feedback, an improved Version 2.0 will be released in early 2011. The authors are therefore keen to get feedback from users or other interested parties.
Please contact Michael Richards (mrichards@forest-trends.org )  
or Steve Panfil (spanfil@climate-standards.org )

<<BACK TO TOP

ESA KATOOMBA GROUP OFFICE ADDRESS CHANGED

ESA Katoomba Group office has moved from Plot 25 Friendship Road, Minister’s Village Ntinda (Uganda).  Our new address will be communicated in due course.

<<BACK TO TOP

New PES Related News from the Region

NEDBANK INVESTS R14-M TO ACHIEVE CARBON NEUTRALITY

Green banking giant Nedbank announced that it is South Africa's first corporate entity to achieve carbon neutrality. This environmental step came at a cost of some R14-million (approx. US$1.8 million), however, green initiatives also ensured cost savings for the group in the region of R28-million a year, explained CEO Mike Brown. Nedbank had spent about a R2-million outlay on measuring the group's carbon footprint and initiating projects within the group to reduce its footprint. The balance was spent on buying carbon credits to offset the greenhouse gas emissions (about 213 000 t) that the group could not cut itself. The carbon credits were purchased from the Rukinga project in Kenya, which is Africa's first large-scale Reduced Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation initiative. The Rukinga project was restoring the natural environment and ecosystem in Kenya's Kasigau corridor, and brought additional benefits to the community through job creation, access to healthcare and education - 18 new classrooms have been built and sustainable farming practices taught.


http://www.engineeringnews.co.za/article/nedbank-invests-r14m-to-achieve-carbon-neutrality-2010-07-13

<<BACK TO TOP

News from Across the Ocean

ANALYSIS: WHO BENEFITS FROM TWO-YEAR MORATORIUM ON FOREST CLEARING?

It didn’t take long for palm oil producers to respond to Norway’s recently signed US$1 billion grant, given in exchange for a two-year moratorium on any new clearing of Indonesia’s rainforest and peatlands. Association of Palm Oil Producers secretary-general Joko Supriyono urged the government to reassess the planned moratorium, citing that its members were struggling with forest concessions that contained unproductive land not suitable for productive growth. Indonesian Palm Oil Commission executive director Rosediana Suharto went further, to note that developing countries including Indonesia need to prioritize economic development over the environment.


http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2010/07/05/analysis-who-benefits-2year-moratorium-forest-clearing.html

<<BACK TO TOP

CHINA TO LAUNCH DOMESTIC CARBON TRADE IN FIVE YEARS

China will introduce domestic carbon trading during the next five years, the China Daily said on 22 July 2010, quoting reports from private government meetings. China has surpassed the US as the world's top emitter of greenhouse gases and is struggling to reduce emissions and pollution because of its reliance on coal. The government recently set a target of cutting carbon emissions per unit of GDP to 40 to 45 per cent of 2005 levels by 2020. So far China’s mechanisms for reducing energy intensity have been moderate: in some areas mining companies are charged "ecological compensation fees" to support nature conservation and pollution treatment. But the nation is already struggling to achieve a target to cut energy intensity by 20 per cent between 2006 and the end of 2010, with the reduction figure currently hovering around 15 per cent.  Officials have reached consensus on the need for carbon trading as the only way for China to meet its 2020 energy intensity targets. But there is still no agreement on the mechanism that should be used. Recognising that more needs to be done, Chinese premier Wen Jiabao warned earlier this year that he was willing to use an "iron hand" and close down poor-performing factories.


http://www.businessgreen.com/business-green/news/2266875/china-launch-domestic-carbon

<<BACK TO TOP

Other Related News

AFRICAN COUNTRIES SHOWCASE GREEN ECONOMY INITIATIVES AT UNEP EVENT AND LAUNCHING OF THE 2010 SEED AWARDS

South Africa, Kenya, Rwanda and Uganda have taken bold initiatives to achieve a green economy transformation. These initiatives were presented at a United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) event during the 13th session of the African Ministerial Conference on the Environment (AMCEN) in Bamako, Mali. The event, which focused on “fostering a Green Economy Transformation in Africa”, provided a platform for Ministers and delegates at AMCEN to share experiences on Green Economy initiatives being undertaken in several African countries as well as opportunities and challenges for Africa to achieve a green economic transformation, building on national sustainable development and poverty reduction initiatives that are underway on the continent. Many governments are allocating, to various degrees, portions of their fiscal stimulus to green economic sectors such as renewable energies and energy efficiency improvements, sustainable agriculture, and better management of water and waste.
 
http://www.unep.org/Documents.Multilingual/Default.asp?DocumentID=628&ArticleID=6632&l=en&t=long

<<BACK TO TOP

UN EYES PRIVATE HELP IN $100 BILLION CLIMATE

A pledge by rich nations in Copenhagen to provide as much as $100 billion a year of climate-related aid to developing countries by 2020 may depend in part on the generosity of private donors and other non-governmental sources. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said that his panel of advisers - seeking ways to fulfill a U.N. climate summit's pledge in the Danish capital last December - was considering private sources to deliver some of the aid promised to help developing countries deal with rising sea levels, drought and other effects of rising temperatures. The panel chaired by prime ministers Meles Zenawi of Ethiopia and Jens Stoltenberg of Norway have been meeting to devise ways to set up a $30 billion annual fund by 2012 that would increase to $100 billion a year by 2020. The panel also includes billionaire George Soros, White House economic adviser Lawrence Summers, the president of Guyana and ministers from Britain, France, Mexico, Singapore and South Africa.


http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5hQwV6qurqXgmSwEF--MI5AQkmYgwD9GUHRMG2

<<BACK TO TOP

Upcoming Events

UNFF AD HOC EXPERT GROUP ON FOREST FINANCING

13-17 September 2010  
Nairobi, Kenya  
This meeting will be the first open-ended intergovernmental ad hoc expert group on financing for sustainable forest management, as part of the UN Forum on Forest’s strategic plan on forest financing.


http://www.un.org/esa/forests/

<<BACK TO TOP

GLOBAL EXPERT WORKSHOP ON BIODIVERSITY BENEFITS OF REDD

20-24 September 2010
Nairobi, Kenya
This workshop is convened by the Secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), in collaboration with the UN-REDD Programme and with the financial support of the Government of Germany. Its purpose is to support the efforts of parties in addressing reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD) in developing countries in the framework of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) in a way that contributes to the implementation of the CBD programme of work on forest biodiversity.


www.cbd.int/doc/notifications/2010/ntf-2010-128-redd-en.pdf

<<BACK TO TOP

CALL FOR WET CARBON PROPOSALS

Danone would like to invest in projects which deliver certified carbon credits and local community benefits through restoring mangrove ecosystems. They are interested in large-scale projects which can be implemented quickly and efficiently. Working in partnership with IUCN and Ramsar, Danone is seeking to invest in wet carbon projects that have the potential to deliver between 10,000 and 300,000 tons per annum of carbon offsets, certifiable by the Clean Development Mechanism or the Voluntary Carbon Standard.


http://wetcarbon.com

<<BACK TO TOP

Resources & Tools

EUíS JRC ANNOUNCES METHODOLOGY FOR CALCULATING CARBON STOCK CHANGES RELATED TO BIOFUELS PRODUCTION

The EU's Joint Research Centre (JRC) has created a methodology for predicting and measuring carbon change in soils and biomass due to land use changes, particularly those related to biofuels production. The methodology, which was adopted by the European Commission in June 2010 to be incorporated into the EU’s Renewable Energy Directive (RED), complies with the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) guidelines for national greenhouse gas (GHG) inventories. It aims to give industry, governments and NGOs a tool to work with in establishing certification schemes for biofuels, which are required for compliance with the RED.


http://climate-l.org/2010/07/14/eu%E2%80%99s-jrc-announces-methodology-for-calculating-carbon-stock-changes-related-to-biofuels-production/#more-37052

<<BACK TO TOP

FSC ANNOUNCES REVISED U.S FOREST MANAGEMENT STANDARD

On July 8, 2010, the United States national initiative of the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC–US) announced the launch of the FSC-US Forest Management Standard for forest operations in the U.S. The revised standard has been developed to capture on-the-ground conditions that represent true forest stewardship and provide the foundation for FSC-certified forestry in the U.S. The result is a label that identifies for consumers the products that are sourced from forests managed to the highest environmental, social, and economic standards.The revised standard is the result of a multi-year process that captured the myriad environmental, social, and economic values associated with forests and forest products. The new US National Standard harmonizes the current nine regional standards into one national standard to reduce unnecessary complexity and improve efficiencies in the management and auditing process. Regional variation is maintained in key areas of forest management and conservation to address where local conditions, including forest types and ecological processes, warrant different management techniques.


http://www.fscus.org/standards_criteria/forest_management.php

<<BACK TO TOP

New Publications

DOES THE OPPORTUNITY COST APPROACH INDICATE THE REAL COST OF REDD+?

While in theory and under certain real-world conditions opportunity cost provides a useful indicator of payments needed, but there is a number of problems in using it in the main political, social and economic contexts faced in the tropical countries that will be implementing REDD+.    This paper questions whether the opportunity cost approach used in many of the major global climate change studies provides realistic cost estimates for use in designing REDD+ programs.  Its focus is that the contextual issues influencing the adequacy and appropriateness of opportunity cost as a proxy for payments required to get successful REDD+ can be major ones in most tropical developing countries; and resolving them can be expensive and time consuming.

http://www.rightsandresources.org/documents/files/doc_1555.pdf

<<BACK TO TOP

STATE OF WATERSHED PAYMENTS: AN EMERGING MARKETPLACE

How can we as a society address the many problems that plague the waterfront? How do we get people to be more mindful about their water use? How do we regulate pollution flowing into our waterways? How do we put a stop to the growing number of dead zones around the world? And how do we ensure that humans – and the plants and animals on which we depend – have access to the quantity and quality of water that they need to survive? This question – at its core – is what this publication is about. It is about one of the tools that can (and will increasingly) be used to resolve our water problems: Payments for Watershed Services (PWS). While PWS may not be the only solution, this document shows that in some parts of the world it can be part of the solution. In some cases it can help change the way we value water, and it can generate the resources needed to remediate and protect our watersheds.


http://147.202.71.177/documents/files/doc_2438.pdf

<<BACK TO TOP

FOREST CARBON OFFSETTING REPORT 2010

 EcoSecurities, Conservation International, Climate, Community and Biodiversity Alliance (CCBA), ClimateBiz and the Norton Rose Group have collaborated to find out what more than 157 global, multinational and regional organisations think about forestry and forest carbon offsetting projects. Some of the key findings of the survey include: Positive attitudes towards forest carbon offsetting have increased in the past year, with nearly 80% of respondents having a 'positive' or 'very positive' attitude compared to only 58% in 2009;   In particular, the most significant change in attitude was from Europe where 84% of participants claim to have a 'positive' or 'very positive' attitude compared to 36% in 2009;   Participants highlighted the most important factor when purchasing forest carbon offsets are carbon standards (89%), closely followed by project location (84%), project type (80%) and the projects' ability to generate additional community and biodiversity benefits (83% & 77% respectively);   Reforestation with native species (89%) and avoided deforestation (78%) were rated the most desirable types of forestry project;  South America (74%) was the most sought-after region from which to purchase forest carbon credits;   The Voluntary Carbon Standard (VCS) and Climate, Community & Biodiversity (CCB) Standards were the two most popular carbon standards (73% and 64% respectively).


http://www.globe-net.com/articles/2010/june/29/forest-carbon-offsetting-report-2010.aspx?sub=12

<<BACK TO TOP

REDD+ IN DRYLAND FORESTS: ISSUES AND PROSPECTS FOR PRO-POOR REDD IN MIOMBO WOODLANDS OF SOUTHERN AFRICA

This report which was published by IIED draws and builds on the work of three separate studies in Namibia, Mozambique and Zambia. It suggests that the miombo woodlands of eastern and southern Africa provide an important opportunity for developing pro-poor payments for avoided deforestation and degradation, for two reasons: firstly, there is strong scientific evidence that the loss of woodlands is associated with a decline in livelihoods; secondly, there are two decades of successful community-based natural resource management (CBNRM) in the miombo region. Challenges associated with REDD+ include, among others, legal and policy issues in order to clarify who owns the carbon and who should benefit from its conservation: organizational barriers often include conflicts between modern political and traditional management authorities and clashes between traditional and customary laws and modern political systems. The authors conclude that the lessons from CBNRM in the miombo ecoregion provide a basis on which REDD+ in dryland forests can build. In a region where poverty is high and is also a key driver of land use change, REDD+ mechanisms need to be pro-poor, explicitly addressing and building the assets and capability of the poorest households at policy level and in practice.


http://www.iied.org/pubs/pdfs/17506IIED.pdf

<<BACK TO TOP

___________________________________

NEWSLETTERS

We invite you to look at the Katoomba Group’s other newsletters.

<<BACK TO TOP